TCC Celebrates 36th Edition of Eyrie Magazine with Annual Unveiling Event

By Kelly Maere, Eyrie Staff Member

The Eyrie Art & Literary Magazine staff excitedly unboxes the 36th edition of the magazine that they’ve worked so hard to complete, preparing for its release to the public in just a few days.

Since 1982, Tallahassee Community College has published a yearly edition of the Eyrie, a student-run magazine showcasing unpublished literature and artwork submitted by TCC students.

“The Eyrie is a great opportunity for students to feel more connected to their campus,” said Niki Costantino, the Eyrie’s Faculty Advisor of the last five years. “It’s an awesome testament to creativity and leadership for the students.”

Art and Literature Magazine staff layout the final proof of the magazine’s 36th edition. (Photo courtesy of Niki Constantino.)

Nearly 300 art and literature pieces were submitted to the Eyrie by students over the course of 2016, 53 of which were selected for publishing in the 36th edition of the Eyrie.

“I’m excited for people to see the retro cover and consistency of the design throughout the magazine,” said the 2017 Eyrie Design and Layout Editor, Donald “D.J.” Paradis. “I thoroughly enjoyed myself and learned so much from this process.”

The unveiling of the newest edition of the Eyrie will be held at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, April 18 in the Fine and Performing Arts Center Lobby. The event is free to attend, but business casual attire is required. Refreshments will be provided, as well as music and speeches made by genre winners. All TCC students and staff are invited to attend.

“It’s a great opportunity for the TCC community to come together and celebrate the students who have had their work published, but also for the students who have worked really hard to make the magazine,” said Costantino, “If you love to listen to works of literature read out loud, or if you like looking at art, it’s a great community event and a chance to really celebrate students.”

Art and Literature Magazine staff layout the final proof of the magazine’s 36th edition. (Photo courtesy of Niki Constantino.)

For more information on the Eyrie Literary & Art Magazine or the unveiling of the 36th issue, please contact Niki Costantino at costantn@tcc.fl.edu.

TCC Student Artist To Watch: Harry Lucas

By Jairo Cortés-Marín

While appearing to be the normal, fun college student, 18-year-old TCC freshman Harry Lucas has more to him than most would expect. With his life motto being “Be here now”, he is a young man making the most out of his opportunities in a wide array of manners.

Born in Chapel Hill, N.C., Lucas has lived in a handful of other places in the U.S, including Colorado, Tallahassee, and several other cities within the state of Florida. Throughout the years he has become a well-rounded artist in every sense of the word; creating pieces in mediums as sculpture, painting and performance art, while writing and performing stand-up comedy.

Beginning with art classes at the age of six Lucas discovered a passion for art.  That wouldn’t be his only passion though, as his mother was an English teacher and it arose another big interest for him: reading. “There were so many books around, so I just always read a lot”, said Lucas, “I just always focused on the fringe subjects, those that pushed my mind to new limits”. It was those readings that inspired him to look beyond what’s commonly accepted and established and fuel his artistic pursuits.

Continue reading “TCC Student Artist To Watch: Harry Lucas”

No Strings (Or Stigma) Attached

By Sydney Selman

Hooking up isn’t as big of a deal as people think it is. It’s been a recurrent activity for decades. So why are we so quick to shame those who participate in casual relationships? I have always viewed sex as simply that: sex. In my opinion, sex can be personal or impersonal, so long as there are two (or more) legally consenting parties.

As hookups become more seemingly prevalent on campus, many suggest that young people are more sexually active at earlier ages in casual circumstances than their Baby Boomer parents were at their age. History tells us that casual sex isn’t unique to the millennial generation.

According to reports, no-strings-attached relationship with other individuals has been a prominent part of the sexual practice in the world since 1943. Additionally, during the so-called sexual revolution in the United States and Europe in the 1960s and 1970s, attitudes towards sexual issues underwent considerable changes. The onset of “the pill” and other forms of birth control, legalization of abortion, and the Women’s Liberation movement is believed to have led to an expanded practice of casual sex.

Research shows that as many as two-thirds to three-quarters of American students have casual sex at least once during college.  For many, sex is a basic human need and desire that requires immediate fulfilment or gratification–precisely what casual sex provides. This is not to say that this is the only way sex should be perceived. I’m merely stating that sex is appropriate with or without an emotional involvement.

(Photo courtesy of Jibri Bailey and Masani Bailey)
(Photo courtesy of The Hippie Hangout)
(Photo courtesy of Jibri Bailey and Masani Bailey)
(Photo courtesy of The Hippie Hangout)
(Photo courtesy of Jibri Bailey and Masani Bailey)
(Photo courtesy of The Hippie Hangout)

With this notion in mind, I personally believe that hookup culture can actually be empowering. The hookup culture itself  is thriving on college campuses, and to a surprising degree, it is women—not men—who are perpetuating the culture.What makes this remarkable development possible is not just the pill or legal abortion, but a whole new landscape of sexual freedom.

Nowadays, for kids in college, an overly serious suitor is comparable to an accidental pregnancy in the 19th century. It’s a prospect to be avoided at all costs for fear that it jeopardizes a promising future. It’s the ability to delay marriage and have temporary relationships that will not derail an individual’s career.

If you consider that relationships can possibly be detrimental to academic success, threaten friendships, provide a breeding ground for jealousy, manipulation, and abuse, it is easy to see why many young people may opt for casual sex. Being open to hooking up means being able to go out and fit into the social scene, get attention from other suitors, and learn about sexuality.

“Hooking up isn’t the rampant, hedonistic free-for-all portrayed by the media,” said the authors of “Is Hooking up Bad for Young Women?” The National Health and Social Life Survey (NHSLS) reported its findings that those born prior to 1942 were less sexually active at a young age than those born after 1942. However, the NHSLS reports suggest the sexual activity between young adults appears to reverse or halt among those born from 1963-1972.

It seems that recent claims about the hookup culture among college students are greatly exaggerated, presumably due to the Baby Boomer generation and the media. Strictly speaking, despite scandalous headlines proposing that young adults are becoming more invested in informal liaisons as opposed to formal relationships, I don’t think these so-called “hookups” are a problem among young adults.

We need to educate those around us that that they must be cautious of sex, but not to fear it. Sex is not to be used as a form of manipulation or stigmatize those who may practice it in a presumably unconventional way.  It is also okay to remain abstinent if it is so desired.

The only ways to counter social inequality among those who are sexual active is to promote respect and awareness. Hooking up is an activity that should not purportedly debase those who choose to participate in it.

What Are Your Thoughts On Casual Hookups?

Name: Alicina Dale Major: Chemistry Hometown: Inverness, Fla. “They can be very empowering to both sides of the relationship. Sometimes it can be a bit stressful. You have to make sure you’re safe. If you meet somebody and you decide to have a causal relationship with them, they might not be the person you thought they were. They can get super jealous and think that it’s more than what it is.” Photo by Sydney Selman)
Name: Alicina Dale
Major: Chemistry
Hometown: Inverness, Fla.
“They can be very empowering to both sides of the relationship. Sometimes it can be a bit stressful. You have to make sure you’re safe. If you meet somebody and you decide to have a causal relationship with them, they might not be the person you thought they were. They can get super jealous and think that it’s more than what it is.”
(Photo by Sydney Selman)
Name: Ethan Brown Major: Humanities Hometown: Tallahassee, Fla. “I’m not a big fan of that. I don’t really feel that you should play with someone’s emotions like that. I don’t think anyone should be judged for it though. You need to understand that one of you may or may not get attached at one point.” Photo by Sydney Selman)
Name: Ethan Brown
Major: Humanities
Hometown: Tallahassee, Fla.
“I’m not a big fan of that. I don’t really feel that you should play with someone’s emotions like that. I don’t think anyone should be judged for it though. You need to understand that one of you may or may not get attached at one point.” (Photo by Sydney Selman)
Name: Gabrielle Benites Major: Social Work Hometown: Tallahassee, Fla. “I think they’re really cool. Yeah, they can be empowering and fun for a lot of people, but I think the most important thing honestly is being on top of testing. As long as you’re doing that, I think it’s awesome. Otherwise--finger wagging. There’s no judgment from me as long as you’re safe about it.” (Photo by Sydney Selman)
Name: Gabrielle Benites
Major: Social Work
Hometown: Tallahassee, Fla.
“I think they’re really cool. Yeah, they can be empowering and fun for a lot of people, but I think the most important thing honestly is being on top of testing. As long as you’re doing that, I think it’s awesome. Otherwise–finger wagging. There’s no judgment from me as long as you’re safe about it.” (Photo by Sydney Selman)

 

 

 

Another Successful Year for Eyrie

By Jairo E. Cortés-Marín

Tallahassee Community College’s award winning Art and Literary Magazine, the Eyrie, is known for showcasing the best art and literature the diverse student body of that TCC has to offer. As part of its mission, it focuses on upholding a standard of quality, good taste, and creativity.

Composed of a student faculty, the Eyrie is published once a year, every spring semester. It is unique in the fact that it is offered as a credit course, which students can sign up for, and become a staff member, in a staff that changes every year.

The process culminates with the unveiling event, in where the latest edition is revealed to the public. This year’s event was held Tuesday, April 12 in the Fine and Performing Arts Center on TCC campus. It was an evening filled with emotion, excitement and much involvement from the staff, featured artists, and viewers.

Editor Megan Stroh (on the left) and Advisor Nicolette Costantino (on the right) pose for a photo during the Eyrie unveiling event.
Editor Megan Stroh (on the left) and Advisor Nicolette Costantino (on the right) pose for a photo during the Eyrie unveiling event.

Members of the Eyrie staff, advisors to the magazine, and several featured artist took the floor and spoke to the audience, focusing on the powerful artwork that composes this year’s 35th Edition.

A special moment was experienced when a minute of silence was held, in honor of former staff member Markeal Dickey, who passed away in an accident during the summer of 2015. A special recognition was also given to Dr. Marge Banocy-Payne for her many contributions to the magazine throughout the years.

Taking Off on the North Carolina License Plate

By Patricia Singletary

There is a particular injustice going on in America that has bothered me for a very long time, and I think it’s far past time to have a serious discussion about it. North Carolina’s license plate motto is completely ridiculous!

This motto, “First in Flight”, is on every North Carolina state sanctioned license plate, and worse, I am forced to see it even here in Florida.

During such times, I’ll be minding my own business and–boom–I’m sent into a nonsensical rage over the grave offense done by a stupid license plate. This hatred has even made me insult the boyfriend of a friend as I went on a rant similar to this one in front of him, not knowing that North Carolina is his ancestral homeland.

I hate the phrase, “First in Flight,” so much because the state is taking credit for something the Wright brothers accomplished, not North Carolina, and that they try to do so is a travesty that seems to me well beyond the scope of any other.

There is a great wrong being done here. Orville and Wilbur Wright were the two brothers who are credited with making the first controlled, powered and sustained heavier-than-air human flight on Dec. 17, 1903 four miles south of Kitty Hawk, N.C.

While they were not the first people to attempt aviation, they were the first to invent aircraft controls that made fixed-wing powered flight possible. But the Wright brothers are not even from that state! They are from Ohio, which rightfully has the motto, “Birthplace of Aviation,” on its license plates!

North Carolina’s appeal was that it does have an environment that Ohio cannot offer, which are the Outer Banks. The Outer Banks are barrier islands off North Carolina’s coast that boast steady winds and isolated beaches.

This is why the Wright brothers took their legendary flight on a beach near the town Kitty Hawk on the Outer Banks.

It was the best location for their experiments. So clearly, the only reason this state had any contribution to the invention of flight at all was the natural environment of the barrier islands right off their coast.

The state government cannot take responsibility for convenient borders. Furthermore, this was not a state funded venture, but rather an experiment done by two entrepreneurs who were only in North Carolina for the strong winds.

So why is this touted as the state’s biggest accomplishment?

Perhaps North Carolina could replace this ridiculous slogan with, “We Hate the Gays!”, at least that one is accurate.

The Social Stigmas We’ve Given Mental Health

By Sydney Selman

One considerable barrier that is currently handicapping the United States’ social progression is the way in which it’s citizens regard those with mental illnesses. Attitudes that view symptoms of psychopathology as aggressive and distressing are prevalent in most societies, including our own. The mindsets of people who view those struggling with mental illness as incompetent and hostile stems from our own culture.

Culture plays a vital role in how society views mental illness.  According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI), culture may be indicative of, “whether or not they seek help, what type of help they seek, what coping styles and supports they have, what treatments might work and more.”

Currently, the cultural representation of mental illness in the U.S. is lacking and skewed at best. The U.S.’s diverse population has been done an injustice by society’s lack of accurate cultural differences and representation.

American society prides itself on diversity and equal representation. However, more often than not, television and film paint an inaccurate reflection of said diversity. Instead, the media homogenizes and misrepresents the lives of those who live with mental illnesses. Media distortions, such as neurotic disorders, frequently foster stigma and even discrimination towards these individuals. In films and on television, the portrayal of mental illness is inaccurate, and perpetuates stigmatization and negative stereotypes of those who struggle with mental illness.

Films such as, Psycho, directed by, Alfred Hitchcock, are a prime example of how those with mental illnesses are stereotyped as dangerous to the public.  This movie is highly relevant because, for many Americans, the media–whether it be scripted television or broadcast news is the primary source of information regarding mental illness.

People often don’t understand mental illness, or when they do, it’s not properly talked about in our various social institutions. In fact, it seems to be looked down upon.  One study reports that 37 percent of employers interviewed would not employ an individual with schizophrenia, and another 23.4 percent would not employ an individual with depression. It seems that mental illness is brushed off and considered unfavorable in most cases. In one study, 45.1 percent of individual’s surveys, stated that they would not want an individual with mental illness such as schizophrenia marrying into their family. Similarly,  28.2 percent would not want an individual with depression marrying into their family.

I can see where these people are coming from. Mental illness does truthfully affect a family as a whole. However, this seems to indicate that within families, mental illness is clearly talked about and perceived negatively. I for one have seen how those with mental illness are blamed for their illness, and taught to conceal their issues. We know that such discrimination can play out in the small and daily interactions between people. Minor instances of discrimination or inequality that are experienced repeatedly, build up to compound a person’s understanding of what is appropriate to discriminate against.

Is the stigma of mental health worth jeopardizing the lives of your family and friends who live with it?

Tally Turn Up Spots for Every Night of the Week

By Priscilla Feroli

As many of us know, the social scene in Tallahassee never sleeps. If you’re looking for not only the best deals, but the most fun look no further. Whether you’re 18 or 21, being a student in Tallahassee allows you into some of the coolest bars and clubs in the state. To find out just where to go, I went out every night of the week for almost a full semester. Yes, every single night. Though my professors began to question my stability, The Talon now has you covered on where to go every night of the week. You’ll never have to sit home scratching your balls again.


(Photo courtesy of Alexandra Hinds)
(Photo courtesy of Alexandra Hinds)

Monday: Mandatory Make-out Monday’s at Clyde’s and Costello’s is the way to go. Yes, we’ve found a reason to actually motivate yourself all day. This jam-packed two floor bar will make you question not just your sanity, but what you did last night. Sloppy yes, boring no! Clyde’s offers free admission to ladies and $1 drinks until 11 p.m. Monday nights. With some of the best DJ’s in Tallahassee, you’ll be feeling yourself all night long. If you’re looking for a pregame, 101 Cantina offers $1 margarita’s from 9 p.m. to 12 a.m., and it’s only a five minute taxi drive away from Clyde’s.

Tuesday: You should always begin at 101 Cantina if you love food and drinks. ‘Til 9 p.m. tacos are just $1 and ‘til 12 a.m. they serve $1 singles, $2 doubles and $3 triples. After midnight head over to Recess right upstairs. If you’re into an older, more mature crowd, you’ll live for Recess. Though the deals aren’t the best in the city, it’s a great place to socialize and have a blast. If you’re looking for a more quiet and calm night, visit The Painted Lady or Potbelly’s which are located right next to each other. Girls are $5 cover and drink free all night while guys are $5 cover and receive $2 drinks and drafts till midnight. After midnight guys pay $3 for drinks and $5 for beer pitchers.

(Photo courtesy of Alexandra Hinds)
(Photo courtesy of Alexandra Hinds)

Wednesday: Ladies, it’s your time to shine with a bottle of wine. Put on your favorite heels and head down to Winedown at 101 Downtown/Mint Lounge. The atmosphere is crazy yet classy and with two completely separate bars, you won’t wait in line for drinks. For just $3 get yourself a glass of house wine or a full bottle for $15. Prior to this, try their food because it’s buy one get one free small plates from 3 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Whether you’re taking a seat and relaxing or on the dance floor, Wednesday’s have never been so fun.

Thursday: If you’re looking to get a bang for your buck and wake up next to someone you don’t remember going home with, Thursday night is THE night. Potbelly’s offers something they call ‘purgatory’- $10 all-you-can-drink ‘til midnight and a wristband for entrance. Trust me, you’ll get your money’s worth. Different crowds come out, and it’s easy to socialize and meet new people in the open atmosphere at Pots. Since the deal ends at midnight, walk just a couple blocks up to The Standard. You’re sure to be amused by the lights and livelihood of this bar after midnight. Drinks at Standard are served by the best looking people in Tally and you can be sure to hear your favorite songs playing from the DJ upstairs.

Friday: The happiest of days and hours. If you’re ready for a long day with a two hour break in-between sunset and night life, try Happy Hour at Clyde’s, Standard, or Potbelly’s. Potbelly’s offers free cover for anyone 21+ ‘til 5 p.m. while Standard has no cover at all. At night head over to The Strip where four bars are open just for your pleasure. ‘Til 11 p.m. The Strip offers $1 well drinks, drafts and shots. If you don’t feel like seeing everybody and their grandmother, Tabu offers ladies 21+ free drinks ‘til midnight. It’s perfect for anyone trying to have a good time in an air conditioned place.

(Photo courtesy of Alexandra Hinds)
(Photo courtesy of Alexandra Hinds)

Saturday: You’re bound to have a great time wherever you go. The two rowdiest places to spend the best night of the week are at The Painted Lady and Coliseum. Both have the best deals to offer, especially if you’re trying to save some money for drunk munchies, and in case you were wondering, Potbelly’s now offers pizza right next to their outdoor bar. Start your night at Painted with their buy one get one champagne deal and $2 drinks ‘til midnight. When Painted closes at 2 a.m., make your way over to Coliseum for an hour and get yourself a $5 Y-Bomb. Between Painted and Coli be prepared to meet students from all over Tallahassee, whether it’s FAMU, FSU or TCC.

Sunday: If you’re going out on Sunday its safe to assume either (A) you’re an alcoholic or (B) it’s your birthday. Whatever the case may be, the Strip on Tennessee Street is the place to be on your holy day. Their Sunday Fun-Day deals are unbeatable. All night long prepare your liver for $5 y-bombs, $5 pitchers and $1 drinks. Cover is free for anybody 21+ and for anybody under it’s $5 for girls and $10 for guys. The Strip is your best bet at finding other rowdy partiers just like you, ready to turn up a Sunday night


Safety Tips

•Make sure a friend or family member always knows where you are.

•The Find My Friends app allows you to track your friends location upon their approval.

•Have a charged phone before you leave home.

•Cover the top of your drink with your hand while holding it.

•Don’t over-do the alcohol.

•Always take a taxi, never drive.

Money Saving Tips

• Download the Party Tutor and Parley app on your Android or iPhone. These apps provide you with the deals of the night, and free entry coupons.

• Get a free uber ride with the code: priscilla582ue

#OverheardAtTCC

“Do you think you’re smarter than a police detective?” “I mean most of the time, yeah.”

“I’m getting a hard on looking at the course work I have to do for advertising.”

“I feel like my life motto is pugs not drugs. Wait just kidding I have ADHD so I guess it would be pugs AND drugs.”

“PSA: No one should wear berets.”

Young Thug Ends Trilogy: Slime Season 3 Review

5 starzzzz

By Alec Palombo

If you thought that Young Thug was simply going to be another phase rapper, Thug put that notion in a casket, literally. After teasing fans with wrong release dates for months, Thug brought out a casket to his South By Southwest performance donned in spray paint, reading “Slime Season 3: 3/25/16”. After all the hype around the Slime Season series, Thug definitely delivered and put the trilogy to rest properly.

With songs like “Power” and “Best Friend” peaking high on the charts from the previous two Slime Season’s, Thug continued his momentum. Prepping for his debut album “Hy!£UN35” (formally pronounced HiTunes), Thug has built a cultish following after releasing a high volume of projects in a short amount of time.

Formally a Gucci Mane protégée, Thug’s career really took off after his 2015 release “Barter 6” a play on words of Lil Wayne’s series of “The Carter’s”. Lil Wayne did not take lightly to this, dissing the Atlanta rapper and urging his fans not to support Young Thug. Things even escalated to Wayne’s tour bus getting shot up in Atlanta, and Young Thug being investigated for being responsible for it.

The mixtape itself saw a lot of success, with songs like “With That,” “Check,” and “Halftime” seeing major commercial success. Since then, Williams has cemented himself as a legitimate star in hip-hop. Let’s hold off on comparing him to someone like Lil Wayne just yet, but Thug’s unique flow and beat picking definitely remind fans a little bit of Wayne. But don’t tell Lil Wayne fans that.

Slime Season 3 starts off with the banger “With Them,” produced by fellow Atlanta artist and longtime collaborator Mike Will Made-it.  The song was previously premiered at Kanye’s fashion show at Madison Square Garden earlier this year, and was the first of eight songs on the tape. Much to fans demise, Slime Season 3 is shorter than the previous Slime Season’s, but was done as an attempt to eliminate “filler” music and make for a more cohesive tape

Though the project is only eight tracks long, Thug arguably made his best work yet, returning to making otherworldly sounding trap music. Songs like “Slime S***,” “Problem,” and “Memo” are perfect examples of why Thug has been on such a hot run lately, making himself one of the most polarizing rappers of 2016. Outside of Future and Young Thug, I don’t think any rapper in the game right now is releasing music as frequently as the rappers hailing from Atlanta.

“Memo,” “Digits,” “Tattoos,” and “Worth It” were all produced by London On Da Track, which should come as no surprise to people that have been listening to Thug for a while. London and Thug have been collaborating out of Atlanta since Thug’s career took off in 2014 with his hit singles “Stoner” and “About the Money.” Since then, the duo has gone on to release hits like “Power,” “Again,” and “Lifestyle.”

Despite seeing a decrease in the project length, it is a very good mixtape overall. Thug is mastering the far-out flow over peculiar, trancing beats and has landed himself in the middle of raps spotlight as a result. I would give the tape a solid 5/5 for Thug, with maybe the biggest complaint being that there was no Metro Boomin placement on the tape. Keep your eyes open for a slew of Thug projects set to release in 2016, with “HiTunes,” “MetroThuggin,” and “MigosThuggin” up on deck.

Volunteer Opportunities

Drive a leg, save a life!

In 2015, the Tallahassee Animal Services alone had almost 5400 animals come through their kennels. Many animals, however, do not begin their journey at no-kill shelters if they are not transferred. A new organization has now created a way for students to volunteer to transfer animals to no-kill shelters. Volunteering is easy and flexible as volunteers give the days they are available, how far they can drive and then will be notified when a shelter requests for a transfer. To volunteer to spend time with happy animals go to Doobert.com.

Tallahassee Animal Services

Whether it’s helping care for the dogs and cats housed at the local shelter and prepare them for a loving home, or helping run their special events, the Tallahassee Animal Services rely on their volunteers for success! Each volunteer must be able to work a two hour shift at least once a week, apply to be a volunteer online, partake in a volunteer interview and finish the process by attending volunteer orientation. To apply, or to see if you are the right fit for the job visit, www.talgov.com/animals